Google Translate boosts its real-time credentials with language-detection for spoken conversations

Translate

Google is lifting the lid on a big update to the Google Translate mobile app, one that promises to expedite the translation process while on the move.

Indeed, the instant translation movement is getting a major boost this week, as Google Translate will soon be able to detect which language is being spoken when you tap the microphone on your device. This better enables a real-time conversation to take place between two different languages.

So let’s say you’re asking for directions, you’d ask the question with the microphone positioned near your mouth, then Google’s dulcet robotic tones will re-ask the question in the language you stipulate. Thereafter, the conversation will automatically be translated between the two tongues, without having to do anything other than talk while holding your phone aloft.

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Careers in tech: Everyone starts somewhere and students can start today

personalizedlearning

When I arrived in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1976, the burgeoning tech industry that we know today was just taking shape.

It was an exciting time where everyone was looking to start something new and share ideas that would eventually create opportunities for people all over the world. I was part of a small crowd of people that shared a similar point of view. It was a bit of groupthink that emanated in the industry back then, all on the shoulders of what happened at Xerox PARC.

Computer science was barely taught in research universities until the mid-1970’s let alone offered in K-12 schools. You really had to seek out groups of people with similar interests and learn on the job about what was possible with technology.

Fast forward almost 40 years and we have seen a huge shift. Technology is now applied to almost every industry and part of every career. However, many schools lack the resources to adequately prepare students for jobs that are available today and for the workforce of the future.

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Apple Pay competitor ‘Android Pay’ is reportedly coming to China

android-apple-3

It looks like Apple Pay will soon face some competition in the mobile payments space from its biggest competitor, Android.

According to a new report from China Business News, a new mobile payments service called Android Pay is coming, and will likely launch in the third quarter of 2015.

Android Pay is reportedly being developed by China UnionPay, which is the biggest credit and debit card provider in China. For context, UnionPay is the second biggest payment network in the world next to Visa, based on the value of processed transactions.

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Ranked: The 12 programming languages that will earn you the most

devbeat picture developer into founder

Computer programming has quickly become one of the most lucrative industries in the US.

The average salary for a computer programmer just hit an all-time high as it approaches $100,000.

But there are some languages and skill sets that are more valuable than others, and Quartz has compiled some data to break down these differences.

Quartz’s Max Nisen pulled out some figures on the most valuable programming languages based on a larger study from the Brookings Institution that was published in July.

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Amid Uber controversy, taxi-hailing app Flywheel raises $12M, adds new management

Flywheel

At the end of Uber’s first full day of PR wreckage on Tuesday, one of my bosses announced she was downloading taxi-hailing app Flywheel and deleting Uber’s app — like many have tweeted they have done.

But while ride-sharing competitor Lyft has likely received a publicity bump from Uber’s massive fumble, it’s likely no one’s benefiting more from this right now than Flywheel. Today, the company is announcing a new round of funding, to the tune of $12 million, which it will undoubtedly use to maximize on this opportunity Uber has given it.

The company also has a new chief executive, Rakesh Mathur, as well as a new chief technology officer and chief financial officer.

Unlike Uber, or even competitors Lyft and Sidecar, Flywheel is not an alternative to taxis. It merely outfits licensed taxis with the same technology. Cab drivers join Flywheel’s network, and in exchange for 10 percent of their proceeds, enjoy the benefits of access to Flywheel’s customer base.

And Flywheel can be a fairly easy sell to consumers — just as with ride-sharing apps, users can call, or hail, a car from their smartphone, track when and where it will arrive, and pay within the app without having to worry about carrying cash (as a San Franciscan, I can say that’s one of the biggest conveniences, as many cab drivers here refuse to take credit cards).

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For ‘Facebook at Work’ to work, it will need to prove it’s worthy of our trust

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It’s not hard to see that Facebook’s (reported) “Facebook at Work” product could bring something unique and useful to the enterprise space. But regardless of what’s in the product, Facebook may not be able to offer trust.

The social network has so far limited itself to use in people’s personal lives and has stored away petabytes of photos of drunks and people making duck-faces. Of course, it’s also stored away lots of information on demographics, preferences, favorite discussion topics, group likes, etc.

Facebook has said that its business platform would be separate and distinct from the personal platform we all know. It’ll also offer a “groups” feature and messaging.

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Why I’m a remote CEO

Why I’m a remote CEO

But I don’t live and work in San Francisco. In fact, I’m based one state (and an entire universe) away in Sedona, Arizona. Why did I choose to be a remote CEO and what does it mean for my company’s growth?

Silicon Valley may be the center of the startup universe, but that doesn’t mean the CEO, or anyone else, has to be physically present there. We use web-based communication and collaboration tools to stay in touch, manage goals and progress, and set strategy. At this point, just about any SaaS startup can run its operations using Zoom, Google Apps, and employee feedback software.

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