50 Quotes on Leadership Every Entrepreneur Should Follow

Every entrepreneur knows that the success of their business ultimately rests on their shoulders. Yes, the product you build and the team you hire are important, but your ability to lead is what carries your company.

With that kind of pressure, it’s easy to feel stressed, lonely and overwhelmed at times. Every great leader has faced a challenge that defined their greatness, which is why we often turn to their advice when needed.

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The 3 Reasons Most People Fall Short at Entrepreneurship

Winning the Day Starts With Winning the Morning

Being a former professional athlete, one of the hardest things I have ever had to do didn’t involve blocking, tackling or going through the dreadful dog days of training camp. It was becoming a successful entrepreneur.

That might come as a shock, as you would expect having a 300-hundred-pound, angry, big and very agile offensive lineman trying to take your head off every single play would be difficult on you. Of course, football, and most sports for that matter, weed out the weak, undetermined and those who have no discipline at all. However, in my eyes, entrepreneurship is the true test of mental strength, guts and courage.

A great majority of entrepreneurs and aspiring business owners fail. We have been hearing that for a while now, and if it isn’t some news source or latest research telling us how hard it is to make it in entrepreneurship — family members and friends are sure to give you their input on how you are out of your mind for even contemplating bringing an idea of yours into the marketplace.

Why is it that most entrepreneurs fall short, or even worse, never even get off the ground? I had the wonderful privilege to chat with entrepreneur, New York Times-bestselling author and mega hustler Gary Vaynerchuk this week to find out what you can do to not fall into the very crowded space of wannapreneurs.

Here are three reasons as to why most entrepreneurs fall short.

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7 Terrible Naming Mistakes Entrepreneurs Make

Here are some of the biggest naming mistakes I’ve seen entrepreneurs make and why you should avoid them.

1. You believe your domain name has to match your business name.

Tesla doesn’t own the domain name Tesla.com. Do you think someone wanting to buy a Tesla gives up if they go there and don’t find the website? Of course not! They type “Tesla cars” into a search engine and find it in no time flat. And they don’t even notice what the domain name is, which by the way is TeslaMotors.com. If Tesla doesn’t have to have an exact match domain name, neither do you.

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10 People Who Will Destroy Your Business

If you want to build a great business, you have to be very deliberate about whom you let into it.

Emotions and behaviors may circulate through social networks in patterns similar to what’s seen in epidemiological models of the flu virus. Every positive person you let into your life increases your chances of being positive 11 percent, estimated a study published in 2010 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society.

“Just one sad friend was needed to double an individual’s chance of becoming unhappy,” Wired summarized about the report.

Figuring out whom to avoid and whom to let in won’t always be easy. But with a little practice, you can get really good at staying far away from people who might bring your business down. Here are 10 people (whether employees or clients) you should avoid if you’re starting a business:

1. The siren.

Sirens are those amazing and enticing people who come into your business and completely distract you. More than anyone else, these people have a way of stealing your focus and throwing your efforts off track.

A lot of promising futures have been sacrificed to sirens. Some people have sold their businesses for way less than they are worth and others have given up on their businesses to chase a get-rich-quick scheme than some sirens pitched them. Don’t let this happen to you. Don’t let an amazing person make you forget that you and your business have something amazing to offer the world, too.

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The Advice I Give All First-Time Founders

Rob Hayes.

Aaron Patzer had come to a crossroads. He knew he was onto something with Mint–but he realized he couldn’t be a successful CEO and also run product for the company. “He’s one of the very few founders I’ve seen who knew it was time to let go and hand things to someone new,” says First Round partner Rob Hayes, who worked closely with Mint. “He wound up hiring this great guy Aaron Forth, and it helped move the company to the next level. That moment when a CEO gives up their core competency to someone else so they can focus on running the company is the moment they become a great leader.”

Hayes started investing in early-stage startup founders a decade ago, and he always gets the same question: “What should I be doing right now?” Through this experience, he’s narrowed down his answer to three things. Patzer did a brilliant job at all three, and notably the most important thing on the list: Hiring the right people. “The other two are don’t run out of money and always have a North Star,” says Hayes.

While each of these pieces presents a huge challenge, this framework can be very powerful. “Founders who achieve these goals always succeed,” says Hayes, citing Mint’s lucrative sale to Intuit. “If they’re constantly thinking to themselves, ‘Okay, this work is in front of me–am I actively achieving one of these three things?’ they don’t fail.” We recently sat down with Hayes to delve into these three areas of focus and tactics to win at each one.

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How Entrepreneurship Has Been Turned Into ‘Airbrushed Reality’

There is an increasingly disturbing trend in the media of idealizing entrepreneurship and the entrepreneur. Everyone seems to want to be an entrepreneur these days. Entrepreneurs make good media subjects. There is compelling existential drama in the God-like process of women and men who attempt to create something out of nothing. It’s sexy. Look no further than the popularity of Shark Tank.

I think a lot of the popular frisson around the idea of entrepreneurship has to do with how people feel increasingly powerless to affect their world. As the traditional institutions of meaning, like family, faith, culture, etc., continue to lose their society-binding authority, people long for a new source of dignity, freedom, and centering.

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16 Startup Trends That Will Be Huge in 2015

Venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz has invested in some of today’s most talked-about startups, including Slack, Buzzfeed, and Instacart.

Andreessen Horowitz has its finger on the pulse of what’s happening in tech. Over on the firm’s website, its investors have shared 16 trends and themes they’re excited about this year. It’s a sort of State of the Union for what’s happening in tech.

We’ve compiled Andreessen Horowitz’s predictions for the 16 startup themes that will be big this year.

1. Virtual reality

“Computer enthusiasts and science fiction writers have dreamed about VR for decades. But earlier attempts to develop it, especially in the 1990s, were disappointing. It turns out the technology wasn’t ready yet. What’s happening now — because of Moore’s Law, and also the rapid improvement of processors, screens, and accelerometers, driven by the smartphone boom — is that VR is finally ready to go mainstream,” Chris Dixon, a general partner at Andreessen Horowitz, says.

We’ve already started to see the emergence of virtual reality: people are still excited and curious about Oculus, which Facebook announced it was acquiring last March. Microsoft and Apple are also reportedly exploring virtual reality too.

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